KellyLance

natural science illustration

palaeopedia:

The largehead Hairtail, Trichiurus lepturus (1758)
Phylum : ChordataClass : ActinopterygiiOrder : PerciformesFamily : TrichiuridaeGenus : TrichiurusSpecies : T. lepturus
Least concern
2 m long and 5 kg (size)
Oceans worldwide (map)
The largehead hairtail (also beltfish), is a member of the cutlassfish family, Trichiuridae. It is a long, slender fish found throughout the tropical and temperate waters of the world. The Atlantic and Pacific populations are also known as Atlantic cutlassfish and Pacific cutlassfish, respectively.
Largehead hairtails can grow to over 2 m in length; the largest recorded weight is 5 kg and the oldest recorded age is 15 years. They live in shallow coastal waters, rising to eat planktonic crustaceans during the day and returning to the sea bed at night.

palaeopedia:

The largehead Hairtail, Trichiurus lepturus (1758)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Actinopterygii
Order : Perciformes
Family : Trichiuridae
Genus : Trichiurus
Species : T. lepturus

  • Least concern
  • 2 m long and 5 kg (size)
  • Oceans worldwide (map)

The largehead hairtail (also beltfish), is a member of the cutlassfish family, Trichiuridae. It is a long, slender fish found throughout the tropical and temperate waters of the world. The Atlantic and Pacific populations are also known as Atlantic cutlassfish and Pacific cutlassfish, respectively.

Largehead hairtails can grow to over 2 m in length; the largest recorded weight is 5 kg and the oldest recorded age is 15 years. They live in shallow coastal waters, rising to eat planktonic crustaceans during the day and returning to the sea bed at night.

amnhnyc:

Musk oxen on Ellesmere Island, Canada, hunker down to wait out a snowstorm. This diorama is located in the Hall of North American Mammals. (at American Museum of Natural History)

amnhnyc:

Musk oxen on Ellesmere Island, Canada, hunker down to wait out a snowstorm. This diorama is located in the Hall of North American Mammals. (at American Museum of Natural History)

spectacularuniverse:

Autonomic nerves of the face, neck, thorax and abdomen by Nicolas Henri Jacob from ‘Traité complet de l’anatomie de l’homme’ by Marc Jean Bourgery, 1831.Dissection to show branches of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V), glossopharyngeal nerve (cranial nerve IX), and hypoglossal nerve (cranial nerve XII). Spinal nerves and brachial plexus, vagus nerve (cranial nerve X), and laryngeal nerves, esophageal plexus, and celiac plexus also shown.

spectacularuniverse:

Autonomic nerves of the face, neck, thorax and abdomen by Nicolas Henri Jacob from ‘Traité complet de l’anatomie de l’homme’ by Marc Jean Bourgery, 1831.

Dissection to show branches of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V), glossopharyngeal nerve (cranial nerve IX), and hypoglossal nerve (cranial nerve XII). Spinal nerves and brachial plexus, vagus nerve (cranial nerve X), and laryngeal nerves, esophageal plexus, and celiac plexus also shown.